Children’s Health

Adolescents who play contact sports, including football, are no more likely to experience cognitive impairment, depression or suicidal thoughts in early adulthood than their peers, suggests a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 11,000 youth followed for 14 years. The study, published this month in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, also found
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A study in experimental models suggests that allopregnanolone, one of many hormones produced by the placenta during pregnancy, is so essential to normal fetal brain development that when provision of that hormone decreases or stops abruptly – as occurs with premature birth – offspring are more likely to develop autism-like behaviors. A Children’s National Hospital
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The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are joining forces to combat childhood cancers in developing countries, where children are four times more likely to die of the disease than in high-income countries due to a lack of affordable treatment and quality care options. Under a new agreement signed today,
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In a study using non-invasive tape strips in young children with eczema (or atopic dermatitis), researchers found many molecular signs of immune dysfunction and skin changes that relate to disease activity. These signs (or biomarkers) were present even before eczema was visible and can be used to track disease activity over time. With more research,
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Adapting features of the electronic medical record system used by doctors in caring for their patients may improve efforts to prevent antibiotic drug resistance, according to Penn State research. Physicians and pharmacists at Penn State College of Medicine collaborated with computer scientists to expand the work of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Penn State Health
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Researchers from Austria have found that ketogenic diets could affect psoriasis-like skin inflammation in mice. They noted that keto diets including medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) such as coconut along with omega-3 fatty acids obtained from nuts and seeds and fish oil could be a recipe for psoriasis exacerbation. They speculated that this could be true for
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Scientists have highlighted a possible link between infection with rotavirus and an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Undergoing vaccination against the pathogen may be an effective way to prevent the condition. Could a routine childhood vaccination reduce the incidence of type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. The exact reason
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Autism spectrum disorders affect one in 59 American children by age eight. With no known quantitative biological features, autism diagnoses are currently based on expert assessments of behavioral symptoms, including impaired social skills and communication, repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. In a paper published in Annals of Neurology, Matthew P. Anderson, MD, PhD, a physician-scientist
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With a shared vision of accelerating genomic discovery and improving patient outcomes, leaders from Boston Children’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (CCHMC) came together in 2015 to form the Genomics Research and Innovation Network (GRIN). Now, the hospitals plan to use a multi-year federal grant to scale up and extend
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Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. The investigators found that different ketogenic diets impacted skin inflammation differently in psoriasiform-like skin inflammation in mice. Ketogenic diets heavy in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) such as coconut, especially in combination
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Oct 16 2019 The National Institutes of Health has awarded a Michigan State University researcher a $2.1 million, five-year grant to search vast databases of existing drugs. Many of the drugs are already approved for treating other disorders, but some could be adapted to treat what often are called “orphan diseases” because of their rarity.
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Five to six year old children had higher systolic blood pressure if their mothers used snus, a moist, powdered smokeless tobacco that contains nicotine, while pregnant compared to children of mothers who did not use snus, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the
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A research team led by UC San Diego has created an interactive map of preterm births – births before 37 weeks of gestation – and potential environmental and social drivers across Fresno County in Central California. Fresno has one of the highest rates of preterm birth in the state. Their findings may increase discussion surrounding
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