Children’s Health

Lenore Jarvis, M.D., MEd, FAAP, remembers feeling fatigue and frustration when, despite her team’s herculean efforts, a 5-year-old died from accidental gunshot wounds. The preschooler had been feeling playful: He surprised a family member who mistook him for an intruder and fired, fatally wounding the child. As an Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services specialist at
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Results from a clinical trial published today in the Journal of Pediatrics show infants who consume formula containing milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) — a complex layer that normally surrounds fat in milk — score higher in tests of cognitive, language and motor development by their first birthdays than infants consuming a milk-based formula that
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The survival of patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has significantly improved in the last several decades. However, novel strategies to identify cases that are likely to respond poorly to treatment are still needed. In a new study published in the journal EBioMedicine, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Cancer Center
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Despite the dire need for primary health care providers in California’s Central Valley, workplace discrimination and harassment can cause them to change practices or leave the region entirely. These insights are reported in a pilot study published today in JAMA Network Open and led by UC Davis health policy expert Michelle Ko. Study participants’ experiences
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Apraxia is an effect of neurological disease. It makes people unable to carry out everyday movements and gestures. For example, a person with apraxia may be unable to tie their shoelaces or button up a shirt. People with apraxia of speech find it challenging to talk and express themselves through speech. In this article, learn
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An international research consortium co-led by Andrea L. Gropman, M.D., at Children’s National Hospital has received $5 million in federal funding as part of an overall effort to better understand rare diseases and accelerate potential treatments to patients. Urea cycle disorder, one such rare disease, is a hiccup in a series of biochemical reactions that
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A study in humans and mice demonstrated that a fetus has its own microbiome, or communities of bacteria living in the gut, which are known to play important roles in the immune system and metabolism. Researchers also confirmed that the fetal microbiome is transmitted from the mother. These findings open the door to potential interventions
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In clinical trials of adults with Huntington’s disease (HD) the Q-Suite Motor Assessment Tool (Q-Motor) has proven to be helpful to detect and quantitate subtle motor abnormalities. With the anticipated arrival of preventive gene therapies that will most likely be administered to young children known to be carriers of the HD mutation, it is crucial
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Mount Sinai researchers have been awarded a $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pursue a deeper understanding of Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual and developmental disabilities in children and young adults, affecting more than 200,000 individuals in the United States. In addition to cognitive problems, individuals
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Adolescents who play contact sports, including football, are no more likely to experience cognitive impairment, depression or suicidal thoughts in early adulthood than their peers, suggests a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 11,000 youth followed for 14 years. The study, published this month in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, also found
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A study in experimental models suggests that allopregnanolone, one of many hormones produced by the placenta during pregnancy, is so essential to normal fetal brain development that when provision of that hormone decreases or stops abruptly – as occurs with premature birth – offspring are more likely to develop autism-like behaviors. A Children’s National Hospital
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The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are joining forces to combat childhood cancers in developing countries, where children are four times more likely to die of the disease than in high-income countries due to a lack of affordable treatment and quality care options. Under a new agreement signed today,
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