Children’s Health

A collaborative study published today in the journal Cell Reports provides evidence for a new molecular cause for neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease. The study, led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital, integrates data from human brain autopsy samples and fruit flies
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An unprecedented case at Boston Children’s Hospital shows that it’s possible to do something that’s never been done before: identify a patient’s unique mutation, design a customized drug to bypass it, manufacture and test the drug, and obtain permission from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to begin treating the patient — all in less
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Rotavirus infection may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, according to a front matter article published October 10 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Leonard C. Harrison of the University of Melbourne in Australia, and colleagues. Rotavirus remains the major cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide, although the advent of vaccination
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Surgery can mend congenital heart defects shortly after birth, but those babies will carry a higher risk of heart failure throughout the rest of their lives. Yet, according to a Science Translational Medicine study published today by UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh researchers, β-blockers could supplement surgery to regenerate infant heart muscle and mitigate the
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As 5G wireless technology is slowly making its way across the globe, many government agencies and organizations advise that there is no reason to be alarmed about the effects of radiofrequency waves on our health. But some experts strongly disagree. Why do some people believe that 5G technology may harm our health? The term 5G
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African-American and other ethnically diverse mothers know the value of a good night’s sleep, but they and their young children are at risk for developing sleep problems if they live in urban poverty, a Rutgers study finds. The study, published in the Journal of Pediatric Health Care, looked at the sleeping patterns of 32 women
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