Children’s Health

Researchers at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands say that airborne transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is possible and should not be discounted. The team’s data showed that sneezing is associated with the most significant probability of aerosol exposure, followed by coughing, speaking, and breathing.
0 Comments
There’s considerable controversy over whether “COVID toes”—red sores or lesions on the feet and hands in children and young adults—are truly caused by COVID-19. A new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology provides evidence in support of the link. In most cases, affected individuals test negative with traditional COVID-19 tests involving throat swabs
0 Comments
Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 3 2020 Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have isolated human monoclonal antibodies that potentially can prevent a rare but devastating polio-like illness in children linked to a respiratory viral infection. The illness, called acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), causes sudden weakness in the
0 Comments
An international research collaboration, including Professor IIJIMA Kazumoto et al. (of the Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) has revealed that NPHS1 is a disease-susceptibility gene for steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome in children. The NPHS1 gene encodes nephrin, a component protein for the renal glomerulus slit diaphragm, which prevents protein from being passed
0 Comments
Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 2 2020 A new study published recently in “BMC Pediatrics” shows a connection between the time of the month when low-income families receive their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits and the number of emergency room visits due to injuries to children from those families. Childhood injuries are the leading
0 Comments
Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 1 2020 George Mason University Professor Dr. Kenneth W. Griffin, received $156,581 from National Health Promotion Associates for a project aimed at preventing prescription drug use among high school students. Griffin is a professor of global and community health in Mason’s College of Health and Human Services. His research focuses
0 Comments
A quality improvement initiative in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Children’s National Hospital led to a significant reduction in treatment with intravenous vancomycin, an antibiotic used for resistant gram positive infections, which is often associated with acute kidney injury. The findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, show the initiative reduceed vancomycin use in
0 Comments
Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 30 2020 How effective are we at safeguarding disabled children? An important new study which seeks to understand how to better protect disabled children and young people from abuse starts this week. Research indicates disabled children are at heightened risk of violence and abuse including child sexual exploitation. Studies show
0 Comments
Findings A UCLA-led study has found that in 2 of 3 states and jurisdictions with policies that require students entering school to receive the human papillomavirus vaccine, vaccination rates among 13-to-17-year-olds were significantly higher than in surrounding states without such policies. In Rhode Island, the vaccination rate among adolescents was 91%, compared with an average
0 Comments
Young children with narrow retinal artery diameters were more likely to develop higher blood pressure, and children with higher blood pressure levels were more likely to develop retinal microvascular impairment during early childhood, according to a new study published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. This is the first study to show this
0 Comments
Children born with cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) commonly undergo multiple surgical procedures between infancy and adolescence. By the time they are teens, patients with CLP with more total surgeries do not have increased psychosocial problems. However, an increased number of surgeries between 8 and 10 years of age may predict increased anxiety and
0 Comments